Tuesday, April 29, 2008

Perception and Interpretation

Sometimes it is a good thing to not understand exactly what we see. When there is no question, when it is totally clear what we are looking at, there is no sense of adventure and no challenge to decipher the mystery in front of us. If we are told that "we can't see the bush for the trees" or that "beauty is in the eyes of the beholder", does this mean that there is more than one answer for what we see and that there is no definitive answer? The answer must then lie with the creator... or perhaps the purpose of the piece is to spark the imagination of the viewer so that the creator can enjoy the uninhibited analysis of their work and revel in the varied feedback from those who think they have "the" answer. If we were to travel the easy road, live the simple life, be comfortable and content and be satisfied with whatever we were given, then the world would be a pretty boring place to live. To expand outside our comfort zone is when we realize that what we have to say- verbally and visually- appeals to others in a way that does not compare to moderation. We need to pose questions, discuss the variations and possibilities, so that we realize that life, like art, is not simple and straight forward. We should need and want the interaction so that our perception and interpretation is not the result of a simple presentation or gift, but the result of complex analysis of what this offering really means to us. Do not be easily satisfied... is there a question behind the question?
Who is "Missing Alice Liddell"? (shown above)

Thanks for listening. Until next time...

Paul


Scav-net Clue #4: (Within Google) - Don't go to the Charles Lutwidge Dodgson location, but instead go to his A.K.A. "____s ______l Photography Page". Find the most prominent New Jersey university collection (Series II) and click to enlarge the 21st thumbnail to discover the person who was the inspiration for his most famous character. The black and white version shown (made in 1858) of this celebrated study was sold at auction for $253,140.

(linger & revel!)


Note: To understand what "Scav-net Clues" are about, see the previous Blog posting under Communication.

Answer (in reverse): ("dnalrednowniecila"foecila)llorracsiwelyblleddil.pecila"diam-raggebeht"

4 comments:

Amy said...

"Wow! Awesome!"

Anonymous said...

First timer.....There is always a
question behind a question?
Go ask Alice I think she'll know.
I think logic and proportion serves this shot well.
Web site is absolutely splendid.

regards........

Choleena said...

Love it!

The Biologist in me sees the vibrating cord as a blacka and white (and grey) xray of snake vertebra.

Love all the reflections and play of light. Another super job!

nelle said...

I enjoy your black and whites for they do not lie. What we see is what you see though individual interpretation is in our own eye. Thank you...